Feb 24, 2024  
2016 Undergraduate Catalog 1.2 (SUMMER - FALL) 
    
2016 Undergraduate Catalog 1.2 (SUMMER - FALL) [ARCHIVED CATALOG - Consult with Your Academic Advisor for Your Catalog Year]

Course Descriptions


The figure in parentheses following the title of the course indicates the number of credit hours for that course. Courses with variable credit are shown with the range of credit available, for example (1 to 6). The College reserves the right to cancel any course if enrollment does not warrant its continuance, and make changes in the curriculum at any time.

Please consult your adviser for any prerequisites.

 

Accounting

  
  • ACC 201 - Financial Accounting (3)

    Financial statement communication, information processing, measuring business income. Measurement and analysis of gross margin, short-term and long-term liabilities, cash flow.
  
  • ACC 202 - Managerial Accounting (3)

    Using accounting information for managerial decisions. Product costing, activity-based costing and activity-based management. Cost behavior and decision making, budgeting, capital investment decisions, performance evaluation, Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 201 , CSC 117  and MAT 124 .
  
  • ACC 301 - Intermediate Accounting I (3)

    Accounting theory and financial statement disclosure requirements relating to current and long- lived assets. Compound interest concepts and their use. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 201  
  
  • ACC 302 - Intermediate Accounting II (3)

    Continuation of Accounting 301. Liabilities and equities accounting for income taxes, pensions, leases revenue recognition and statement of cash flows. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 301  and FIN 333 .
  
  • ACC 303 - Cost Management (3)

    Decision models and methods for estimation and management of business costs, budgeting, activity-based cost systems, strategic cost management. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 202 
  
  • ACC 304 - Income Tax Accounting (3)

    Federal tax regulations and their application to the taxation of individuals. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 202 
  
  • ACC 307 - Accounting Information Systems (3)

    Accounting information and technology; elements of an accounting system; internal controls; business processes; documentation; systems planning and analysis; systems implementation and control. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 202 , CSC 217 , and Junior standing.
  
  • ACC 401 - Auditing (3)

    Study of audit standards and techniques in the conduct of an audit examination. Theory and practice of auditing is studied from both internal and external audit points of view. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 302  and ACC 307 .
  
  • ACC 402 - Auditing Case Study (1)

    Comprehensive audit case study including system of internal control, testing procedures, preparation of audit adjustment and audit report. Emphasis on computer as auditing tool. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 401 .
  
  • ACC 403 - Accounting for Multinational Business (3)

    Financial instruments, derivatives, hedging, financial statement translation, substantial influence investments, controlled subsidiaries, merger accounting and goodwill, consolidated financial statements in multinational business. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 302  or the equivalent.
  
  • ACC 404 - Public Sector Financial Management (3)

    Public sector resource flows. Financial planning, budgeting, cost management, financial reporting, and financial statement analysis of governmental, health, educational, and not-for-profit organizations.  Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 202  and FIN 333 .
  
  • ACC 405 - Accounting Problems (3)

    Problems selected for value in furnishing a comprehensive review of accounting principles and practices taken from Certified Public Accounting examination of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 403  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • ACC 406 - Forensic Accounting & Fraud Auditing (3)

    Integration of accounting, auditing and fraud investigative skills. Resolution of accounting ‘irregularities.’ Use of auditing case studies for analyzing documents and internal controls, tracing funds, examining business interruption losses, and preserving and preparing evidence. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 302 .
  
  • ACC 491 - Current Topics in Accounting (1)

    Update on current changes in pronouncements of the AICPA, FASB, SEC, and GASB and analysis of their effects on the contemporary accounting environment. Prerequisite(s); if any: Senior standing.
  
  • ACC 501 - Introduction to Accounting (3)

    Introduction to financial statement communication, information processing, measuring business income, and introduction to use of accounting information for managerial decisions. Topics include financial statements, cash flows, budgeting, and performance evaluation.
  
  • ACC 503 - Advanced Corporate Tax (3)

    Study of federal tax regulations and their application to the taxation of the partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 304  or Graduate standing.
  
  • ACC 506 - Health Care Accounting Processes (3)

    HCA students are required to have competency in understanding and using their fiscal knowledge to make mindful decisions in health care organizations. The varied internal accounting processes are reviewed and analyzed.
  
  • ACC 511 - Auditing and Assurance Services (3)

    Study of audit standards and techniques in the conduct of an audit examination. Theory and practice of auditing is studied from the point of view of the external auditor. Must be enrolled in the MBA Accountancy program.
  
  • ACC 515 - Advanced Accounting (3)

    Equity method investments, Goodwill, Merger accounting for dissolutions and consolidation methods of accounting for business combinations. Accounting for variable interest entities. Prerequisite(s); if any: ACC 302  or Graduate standing.
  
  • ACC 541 - Corporate Financial Reporting (3)

    Financial reporting system for business entities; environment, information system, financial statements, current assets and liabilities, income measurement, long-term finance, shareholders’ equity, and taxation.
  
  • ACC 561 - Introduction to Forensic Accounting and Fraudulent Financial Reporting (3)

    This course will develop the student’s understanding of what forensic accounting is. Students will also learn strategies for detecting and investigating common financial statement fraud schemes.

Aging Studies

  
  • AGE 101 - Introduction to Aging (3)

    Historical overview of aging in the United States; its influence on; the development of current social policies; and the impact of changing demographics on future social and economic policies.
  
  • AGE 214 - Biology of Aging (3)

    Study of the effects that age related and age associated cellular and organismic changes have on the human aging process. Open to all majors, but may not count as a major elective for biology majors. Meets with BIO 214 .
  
  • AGE 218 - Rural Elderly (3)

    Overview of rural elderly: A study and comparison of issues affecting quality of life.
  
  • AGE 273 - Introduction to Aging Network- Community Placement (1 to 3)

    Introduction to range of settings in the aging network. Each course focuses on a different setting. Includes in-class and field experience. May be repeated three times in different settings. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of Instructor required.
  
  • AGE 300 - Select Topics: Aging Studies (3)

    Issues affecting older adults such as environmental accessibility, aging in special populations, and administration of services.
  
  • AGE 314 - Life Review (3)

    History of life review in the study of aging. Students will read research literature regarding life review as a part of the aging process, read life reviews and conduct their own life review projects.
  
  • AGE 315 - Aging and Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (3)

    Discusses the intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) from a lifespan perspective and wellness approach. Includes discussion of risk factors and prevention options for older persons with IDD.
  
  • AGE 320 - Supportive & Senior Housing (3)

    An introduction to senior housing. The history, segments of the continuing care system, services provide, and influential factors and financing are described. An ideal housing system and future trends are addressed.
  
  • AGE 400 - Select Topics: Aging Studies (3)

    Exploration of aging issues through an individualized plan that integrates theory and practical experience.
  
  • AGE 411 - Aging and Mental Health (3)

    Typical and abnormal emotional and intellectual changes in later life are addressed. Adjustment to disability and treatment (counseling and drugs) are discussed.
  
  • AGE 490 - Capstone Project (3)

    Combine information and skills learned in regular courses, community placements, and other experiential learning with theory and direct this combined knowledge toward the completion of a substantial self-defined project. Prerequisite(s); if any: AGE 101  and AGE 214 /BIO 214 .

Animal Behavior

  
  • ANB 420 - Short Course in Animal Behavior (1)

    Examination of animal behavior not covered extensively in another course. The format could include lectures, discussions, laboratory exercises, field work, or any combination of these. Students may take up to three times for upper level animal behavior elective credits if topics differ. Students may subsequently take for unlimited free elective credits if topics differ. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211 , BIO 212 , and BIO 232  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • ANB 450 - Senior Research (3)

    Students conduct original research on a subject in animal behavior based on proposals generated in PSY 312  or in consultation with a faculty mentor in the Psychology or Biology Department. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 231 , BIO 232 , or PSY 312 ; Junior or Senior standing; and Permission of Instructor.
  
  • ANB 495 - Senior Seminar (3)

    Critical analysis of current research by reading literature in the field of animal behavior to foster a more comprehensive understanding of the field. Integrates previous learning in small group settings.

Anthropology

  
  • ANT 101 - Introduction to Anthropology (3)

    Overview of anthropology, highlighting diversity and global scope of human experience, past and present. Biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistic and cultural anthropology.
  
  • ANT 205 - Human Beings in Evolutionary Perspective (3)

    Introduction to the physical and cultural evolution of our species, to evolutionary theory and its implications for the understanding of human culture, and to archaeology and physical anthropology as fields of study.
  
  • ANT 243 - Caribbean Peoples and Cultures (3)

    Course exposes students to past and present Caribbean peoples, cultures, and historical processes, including African, European, and indigenous contributions to Caribbean societies; plantation slavery; emancipated communities.
  
  • ANT 251 - Native American Culture and History (3)

    Survey of cultures of native North Americans, from original peopling of the continent to the present. Emphasizes dynamism, ingenuity, and integrity of Native American cultures, and the history of their contact with Europeans.
  
  • ANT 257 - Introduction to Gender and Sexuality (3)

    Examination of the major concepts and theories in social science studies of sex, gender, and sexuality, with a focus on anthropological approaches.
  
  • ANT 267 - Introduction to Archaeology (3)

    History and current contexts of archaeology as a discipline and profession in the United States, and basic principles and methods of archaeological practice.
  
  • ANT 274 - Cultural Anthropology: Research and Writing (3)

    Concentrated study of research methods and writing in ethnography and ethnology. Focuses on issues of ethics, rapport, knowledge production, and reflexivity through reading, research exercises, and research project design/presentation. Prerequisite(s); if any: ANT 101 
  
  • ANT 283 - Urban Anthropology (3)

    Introduction to the diversity of city life around the world and through history, especially as it reflects the social, political, and economic organization of the larger society. Detailed examinations of urban anthropological research methods.
  
  • ANT 297 - Peoples and Cultures of the World (3)

    Close examination of world cultures with a focus on economics, politics, gender, kinship, and religion. Prerequisite(s); if any: ANT 101  
  
  • ANT 300 - Select Topics: Anthropology (1 to 3)

    Topics in various aspects of Anthropology. Vary from year to year.
  
  • ANT 312 - Social Science Research Methods (3)

    Application of scientific methods to study human behavior; surveys diverse research methods used in sociology, anthropology, and other behavioral sciences; students originate, design, and conduct research projects. Same as SOC 312 .
  
  • ANT 314 - Native American Languages (3)

    Provides an overview of the indigenous languages of the Americas including their structure, classification, history, endangerment, revitalization, writing, and reflection of cultural features in expressions of animacy, respect, counting systems, kinship terms, possession, and vocabulary.
  
  • ANT 323 - Archaeology of North America and the Caribbean (3)

    Explores archaeology of North America and Caribbean. Students understand peoples and cultures from first migrants to recent past; evidence of past American Indians, European settlers, enslaved and free African Americans; recent immigrant and indigenous cultures.
  
  • ANT 335 - Forensic Anthropology (3)

    Basics of crime scene archeology and human remains recovery. Skeletal analysis; personal identification; courtroom testimony; police procedures; mass fatality incident planning. Meets with ANT 535 .
  
  • ANT 345 - Historical Archaeology (3)

    Archeological exploration of social history of European, African, and Asian peoples in North America after 1500 C.E. Field excavation; site interpretation; archived research; artifact identification. Meets with ANT 545 .
  
  • ANT 347 - Archaeological Field School (6)

    Practical experience in archeological fieldwork. Exploration of regional history and cultural tradition through field trips and documentary research. Project locations may vary, and may include both domestic and international sites. Meets with ANT 547 .
  
  • ANT 351 - Language and Culture (3)

    The Interrelation of culture and language; consideration of language impact on cultural behavior, cognition, and perception. Introduction to problems of socio-linguistics and communication. Meets with ENG 351 .
  
  • ANT 362 - Magic & Religion (3)

    Religious and magical behavior across the globe. Emphasis on major religions, magic and religion in folk society; shamanism, witchcraft, sorcery, ritual, and taboo; myths of origin, world view, and values in cross-cultural perspective.
  
  • ANT 367 - Food and Culture (3)

    An anthropological and cross-cultural analysis of food production, distribution, and consumption.
  
  • ANT 375 - Culture & Personality (3)

    The individual in society, and the role of environmental, social, and cultural factors in the development of personality. Cross cultural use of projective and other type of psychological tests. The role of culture in perception, cognition, and mental illness.
  
  • ANT 400 - Select Topics: Anthropology (1 to 3)

    Topics in various aspects of anthropology (social, physical, archaeological). The exact topics may vary from year to year in response to the needs and interests of students and instructors. May be repeated with different topics. Prerequisite(s); if any: Instructor may determine reasonable prerequisites for the specific topic.
  
  • ANT 405 - Sociology & Anthropology Theory (3)

    The development of Sociology and Anthropology; critical ideas about society and culture from early thinkers through the present. Same as SOC 405 
  
  • ANT 415 - Cultures, Health, & Healing (3)

    Examination of effects of culture on health and beliefs and the practices related to illness and healing. Prerequisite(s); if any: ANT 101  or SOC 151  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • ANT 423 - Senior Seminar (3)

    The application and development of sociological and anthropological theory and research methods through a series of advanced readings and discussions and the development of an independent research project. Same as SOC 423 . Prerequisite(s); if any: ANT 312 /SOC 312 .
  
  • ANT 427 - Contemporary Issues in Mexican Culture (3)

    Examination of contemporary anthropological research on themes central to contemporary life in Mexico, including migration; drug trafficking and related violence; tourism; race and ethnicity; gender; and agriculture. Prerequisite(s); if any: ANT 251 .
  
  • ANT 449 - Anthropology of Aging (3)

    Aging in a variety of cultures. Cultural differences in beliefs and practices related to the aged. Critical evaluation of aging in industrial society and of cultural- bound theories of aging.
  
  • ANT 470 - Anthropology - Internship (1 to 6)

    Students serve on the staffs of established agencies under co-supervision of designated agency staff person and appropriate faculty person. Periodic conferences, relevant reading assignments, and papers analyzing internship experience required. Prerequisite(s); if any: SOC 151 , SOC 312 , and Permission of Instructor and division dean. Meets with SOC 470 .
  
  • ANT 490 - Independent Study (1 to 6)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and the instructor, subject to approval of coordinator and division dean.
  
  • ANT 500 - Contemporary Topics (3)

  
  • ANT 525 - Ancient Cities (3)

    Development and functioning of ancient cities, with emphasis on the archeology of the ancient Near East. Importance of sedentism, agriculture, and imperialism for functioning of ancient cities.
  
  • ANT 527 - Religion in the Ancient World (3)

    Ancient religions of the Near East that led to development of Western religious traditions. Archaeological and anthropological perspectives on religions of Mesopotamia and the Levant, including the development of Judaism and early Christianity.
  
  • ANT 535 - Forensic Anthropology (3)

    Basics of crime scene archeology and human remains recovery. Skeletal analysis; personal identification; courtroom testimony; police procedures; mass fatality incident planning. Meets with ANT 335 .
  
  • ANT 545 - Historical Archaeology (3)

    Archeological exploration of social history of European, African, and Asian peoples in North America after 1500 C.E. Field excavation; site interpretation; archived research; artifact identification. Meets with ANT 345 .
  
  • ANT 547 - Archaeological Field School (6)

    Practical experience in archeological fieldwork. Exploration of regional history and cultural tradition through field trips and documentary research. Project locations may vary, and may include both domestic and international sites. Meets with ANT 347 .
  
  • ANT 551 - Contemporary Issues of Native American Life (3)

    Relationships of Native Americans to larger society at the beginning of the 21st century. Focus on identity, economic development, health, environment, and legal and political issues. Seminar format. Prerequisite(s); if any: One of the following: ANT 101 , SOC 151 , SOC 252 , SOS 101, or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • ANT 590 - Independent Study (3)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and the instructor, subject to approval of coordinator and division dean.

Arabic

  
  • ARB 101 - Beginning Arabic I (3)

    Pronunciation and aural comprehension, elementary grammar, oral and written practice, reading of simple prose, cultural overview. Language lab required.
  
  • ARB 102 - Beginning Arabic II (3)

    Continuation of ARB 101 and develops further all skills, speaking, writing, and listening, to complete the novice proficiency level of Arabic.
  
  • ARB 201 - Intermediate Arabic I (3)

    Reading; grammar review; oral work; translation; simple composition. Prerequisite(s); if any: ARB 102  or equivalent.

Biology

  
  • BIO 101 - Anatomy & Physiology I (0, 4)

    Structure and function of the human body, including cells, tissues, skin, and the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. May not be taken by biology majors except by special permission.
  
  • BIO 102 - Anatomy & Physiology II (0, 4)

    A continuation of BIO 101  examining the structure and function of the human body including the endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 101 
  
  • BIO 103 - Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology (1, 3)

    Examination of the major structures and functions of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems in humans. This course is intended for students in programs that require a one-semester anatomy and physiology course.
  
  • BIO 111 - Human Ecology (3)

    The principles of ecosystem function covering such topics as energy flow, flood chains, nutrition and nutrient cycling, populations, and communities. Knowledge of these principles will be applied to the human species and its role in ecosystems. (Lecture only.) Open to all majors, but may not count as a major elective for biology majors.
  
  • BIO 111L - Human Ecology Lab (1)

    Scientific methodology and its applications for the non- science major. Biodiversity, symbiosis, evolution, population dynamics, genetics, energy, PH, and site visits. Corequisite(s): BIO 111 .
  
  • BIO 112 - Human Sexuality (3)

    Exploration of the nature and historical perceptions of human sexuality, its biological foundations, social and behavioral implications, cross-cultural comparisons, encouraging personal refection and self-discovery while improving interpersonal communication and understanding. Open to all majors but may not count as a major elective for biology major. Same as PSY 207 .
  
  • BIO 113 - Human Genetics (3)

    Fundamental principles of human genetics and the social, medical, and moral issues raised by current research in such areas as race, behavior, intelligence, and genetic engineering. (Lecture only). Open to all majors, but may not count as a major elective for biology majors.
  
  • BIO 201 - Gross Anatomy (0, 4)

    Human anatomy with emphasis on structure and function of the neuromusculoskeletal system of the extremities and back. Laboratory involves examination and identification of these structures through dissection of human cadavers. Open only to students accepted in Occupational Therapy or Physical Therapy programs or with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 101  and BIO 102 .
  
  • BIO 202 - Neuroanatomy & Neurophysiology (0, 4)

    Study of the structures and function of the human nervous system as a basic for clinical treatment techniques. May not be taken by biology majors except by special permission. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 201  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 203 - Microbiology (0, 4)

    Introduction to microbiology with emphasis on pathogenic micro-organisms, their role in disease, their inhibition and destruction; principles and techniques of bacteriology. Not open to biology majors. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 101  and BIO 102 .
  
  • BIO 205 - Human Nutrition (3)

    Study of dietary factors required for human growth and health, underlying bases of these requirements, and specific components available to meet these needs. Pre or Co-requisite(s): CHE 211  and BIO 102 .
  
  • BIO 207 - Neurological Disorders (3)

    Anatomical and physiological bases for selected neurological disorders, and evidence-based treatments. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 101  and BIO 102 .
  
  • BIO 208 - Pharmacology & Pathophysiology (3)

    Relationship between physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. Theoretical understanding of physical assessment in clinical practice. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 101 , BIO 102 , CHE 211 , or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 211 - General Biology I (0, 4)

    Study of life as characterized by cell organization and structure, release and utilization of energy, photosynthesis growth and reproduction, interaction with the environment, Mendelian inheritance, genetic technology, and change over time. Laboratory experiences reflect lectures and expose students to scientific methodology, hypothesis building and testing, various qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis.
  
  • BIO 212 - General Biology II (0, 4)

    Diversity of life approached through the unifying theme of evolution. Comparative study of the form and function of representative species. Laboratory emphasizes comparative anatomy studies of the structural components of various organisms. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 214 - Biology of Aging (3)

    Study of the effects that age related and age associated cellular and organismic changes have on the human aging process. Open to all majors, but may not count as a major elective for biology majors. Meets with AGE 214 .
  
  • BIO 231 - Research Methods I (3)

    Introduction to experimental design and analysis. Evaluate merit and content of primary literature, critique oral presentations by researchers, use computer spreadsheets and statistical software for data organization, graphical and written presentation, and data analysis. Corequisite(s): BIO 211  or BIO 212 , or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 232 - Research Methods II (3)

    Research design and presentation. Writing research papers using specific journal format and word processing software, graphical and oral presentation of research projects, writing letters of application and resumes, and critiquing oral presentations of researchers. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 231  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 290 - Independent Study (1 to 3)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and the instructor, subject to approval of coordinator and division dean.
  
  • BIO 313 - Introduction to Paleobiology (0, 4)

    Fossil invertebrates and some plants and vertebrates, including dinosaurs. Fossil record as a tool for stratigraphy, paleoecology, paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatological reconstructions, and understanding evolution and mass extinctions. Lectures, laboratory, field trips. Same as GOL 313 . Prerequisite(s); if any: GOL 225  or GOL 226  or BIO 212  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 321 - Genetics (0, 4)

    This course focuses on the fundamental classical and modern mechanisms of inheritance and their consequences as viewed from the molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. Laboratories include exercises and experiments that explore classic and modern genetic techniques. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211 . Pre or Co-requisite(s): CHE 211 .
  
  • BIO 322 - Developmental Biology (0, 4)

    Students will learn the fundamental and modern concepts, principles, and mechanisms responsible for animal and plant growth and development from gametogenesis through organogenesis. These processes will be described and demonstrated using various model organisms and classical and modern experimental approaches both in lecture and in the laboratory. Laboratories include observational and experimental studies. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211  and BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 323 - Principles of Ecology (0, 4)

    Environmental relationships of plants and animals, emphasizing community structure, population interactions and dynamics, energy relationships, and nutrient cycling. Laboratory devoted to field studies of local communities and populations. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211  and BIO 212 .
  
  • BIO 324 - Animal Physiology (0, 4)

    The basic physiological principles of the neurological, endocrinological, muscular, cardiovascular, digestive, reproductive, and respiratory systems. Emphasis is given to the interrelationships of the physiological process among these systems through biofeedback control in maintaining homeostasis. Laboratory topics concurrent with lecture. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 212  and CHE 212 .
  
  • BIO 325 - Botany (0,4)

    Plant biology investigating plant anatomy, morphology, ecology, geography, physiological adaptations, and systematics. Lecture, field, and laboratory exercises. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211 , BIO 212 , or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • BIO 327 - Cell Biology (0, 4)

    Study of the cell as an organism. Organization and function of sub-cellular organelles and cellular interactions in tissues, emphasis on experimental methodology. Laboratory introduces methodology and instrumentation to investigate structure-function relationships in cellular structures. Prerequisite(s); if any: BIO 211 , CHE 211  and CHE 212 .
 

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