Jul 23, 2024  
2016 Undergraduate Catalog 1.2 (SUMMER - FALL) 
    
2016 Undergraduate Catalog 1.2 (SUMMER - FALL) [ARCHIVED CATALOG - Consult with Your Academic Advisor for Your Catalog Year]

Course Descriptions


The figure in parentheses following the title of the course indicates the number of credit hours for that course. Courses with variable credit are shown with the range of credit available, for example (1 to 6). The College reserves the right to cancel any course if enrollment does not warrant its continuance, and make changes in the curriculum at any time.

Please consult your adviser for any prerequisites.

 

Homeland Security and Emergency Management

  
  • HEM 321 - Leadership Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management (3)

    Effective measures for personal and professional leadership, and decision-making for crisis leadership and command; including complex issues of inter-agency command, planning, and coordination. Prerequisite(s); if any: HEM 301 .
  
  • HEM 328 - Security Administration (3)

    Principles of administration of physical, human, and asset security. Risk assessment, training, emergency management, disaster recovery, and the global aspects of security administration.
  
  • HEM 332 - Technological Challenges in Homeland Security and Emergency Management (3)

    Technical and electronic issues affecting homeland security and emergency management in the United States with an emphasis on communications and cyber capabilities. Prerequisite(s); if any: HEM 301 .
  
  • HEM 343 - Legal Issues in Homeland Security and Emergency Management (3)

    Legal and liability issues affecting homeland security and emergency management operations in the United States. Case law and current litigation will be reviewed. Prerequisite(s); if any: HEM 301 .
  
  • HEM 354 - Communications in Homeland Security and Emergency Management (3)

    The various levels and types of communications that have bearing on the fields of homeland security and emergency management, including diversity and cultural issues, inter-agency relations, public relations, and crisis control. Prerequisite(s); if any: HEM 301 .
  
  • HEM 368 - Issues in Border and Transportation Security (3)

    Historical and contemporary challenges in U.S. transportation security. Ongoing balance between the free flow of people, goods, and services across U.S. borders and homeland security issues.
  
  • HEM 380 - All Hazards: Planning, Response, Mitigation, and Recovery (3)

    The role that emergency management personnel play in managing man-made and natural disasters. Specifically, this course examines the four phases of Emergency Management: Planning, Response, Mitigation, and Recovery. Prerequisite(s); if any: HEM 301 .
  
  • HEM 391 - The National Incident Management System and The Incident Command System (NIMS and ICS) (3)

    Examination of operational framework, including the National Incident Management System and Incident Command System, used in a multi-agency response to critical incidents. Prerequisite(s); if any: HEM 301 .
  
  • HEM 461 - Senior Seminar - Homeland Security and Emergency Management (3)

    Selected topics of current interest. Emphasizes critical analysis of current research literature and development of action projects by seminar members. Integrates previous learning as a capstone experience. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of Instructor.
  
  • HEM 470 - Homeland Security and Emergency Management - Internship (6 to 15)

    Participation on staff of homeland security or emergency management agency under co-supervision of faculty and agency personnel. Field experience, periodic conferences and seminars, written and reading assignments designed to combine theory and professional practice. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of Instructor.
  
  • HEM 475 - Senior Project (3 to 6)

    Senior level research project on policy issue determined after consultation with faculty supervisor. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of Instructor.

Human Rights Advocacy

  
  • HRA 200 - Select Topics: Human Rights Advocacy (1 to 3)

    Topics in various aspects of Human Rights Advocacy. May vary from year to year.
  
  • HRA 211 - Introduction to Human Rights (1)

    Introduction to contemporary human rights problems and the global response to these issues. Same as GOV 211 .
  
  • HRA 400 - Contemporary International Problems (1 to 3)

  
  • HRA 464 - International Protection of Human Rights (3)

    Exploration of human rights protection as an increasingly internationalized process and its limitations on sovereignty. Successes and failures of international and region inter-governmental efforts to monitor, control, and remedy abuse of sovereign power. Same as GOV 464 .
  
  • HRA 470 - Human Rights Advocacy - Internship (1 to 12)

    Participation in a discipline - or subject - related experience.
  
  • HRA 490 - Independent Study (1 to 3)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and the instructor, subject to approval of coordinator and division dean.
  
  • HRA 500 - Select Topics: Human Rights Advocacy (3)

    Topics in various aspects of Human Rights Advocacy. May vary from year to year.

International Studies

  
  • IST 101 - World Regional Geography (3)

    Interdisciplinary survey of world geography and cultures. Overview of the physical, political, and economic geography of world regions.
  
  • IST 225 - Chinese Civilization and Culture (3)

    Introduction to ancient and modern Chinese culture as evident in literature, art, music, education, marriage, health care, and other areas. No knowledge of Chinese language required.
  
  • IST 235 - Russian Civilization and Culture (3)

    Introduction to ancient and modern Russian culture as evident in literature, art, music, education, marriage, health care, and other areas. No knowledge of Russian language required
  
  • IST 247 - Japanese Civilization and Culture (3)

    Introduction to modern Japan, Japanese society and culture economy and business, politics and diplomacy. Offered only as part of the Japan summer program at Osaka International University.
  
  • IST 248 - American Civilization and Culture (4)

    Interdisciplinary introduction to modern American culture, geography, history, and society. Emphasis on multiculturalism, U.S. politics and government, economy, and business. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of Instructor required.
  
  • IST 300 - Select Topics: International Studies (1 to 3)

    Topics of various aspects of international studies. May vary from year to year.
  
  • IST 377 - Comparative Criminal Justice: Study Abroad (3)

    Comparative study of criminal justice institutions in other countries. Students will visit institutions and interact with professional in the agencies and facilities. Same as CRJ 377 .
  
  • IST 400 - Contemporary International Problems (1 to 3)

    Consideration of one or more contemporary problems which are international in scope. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of Instructor.
  
  • IST 465 - Political Risk Analysis (3)

    This course attempts to gauge the likelihood that particular countries may suffer a catastrophic economic and/or political collapse. We examine sources of risk, methodologies used to determine levels of risk, and methods of mitigating risks. Same as GOV 465 .
  
  • IST 470 - International Studies - Internship (3 to 6)

    Guided experience in international firm or agency. Written reports and periodic meetings with adviser and field supervisor. Prerequisite(s); if any: Upper level standing and permission of instructor and division dean.
  
  • IST 471 - Japanese Studies - Internship (3)

    Guided experience in a Japanese business or government office. Written reports, readings, and periodic meetings with adviser and field supervisor. Offered only as part of the Japan summer program at Osaka International University.
  
  • IST 487 - Senior Seminar in International Studies (3)

    Consideration of one or more international problems.
  
  • IST 490 - Independent Study (1 to 6)

    In depth exploration of an international problem. Individual independent study based on a plan submitted by student. (No more than three hours in any semester.) Refer to College regulations concerning independent study for guidelines.

Intensive English Language

  
  • IEL 90 - Structure & Composition (0)

    Build and apply knowledge of different types of academic writing and the grammar of academic writing. Complete a variety of academic writing activities, the conventions of researching, drafting, citing, revising, and editing are practiced. Corequisite(s): IEL 91 , IEL 92 , IEL 93 .
  
  • IEL 91 - Reading & Vocabulary I (0)

    Develop reading skills to be successful in academic courses. Develop academic reading skills by building academic vocabulary, practicing note-taking of academic readings, understanding and answering test questions, and develop critical thinking skills. Corequisite(s): IEL 90 , IEL 92 , IEL 93 .
  
  • IEL 92 - Oral Communication I (0)

    Learn and practice academic oral communication skills related to speaking and pronunciation. Practice the conventions of communicating in the American university classroom, complete academic speaking tasks and improve pronunciation. Corequisite(s): IEL 90 , IEL 91 , IEL 93 .
  
  • IEL 93 - Listening & Note-Taking I (0)

    Develop listening skills to be successful in academic courses. Develop academic listening skills by building academic vocabulary, practicing note-taking of academic lectures, understanding and answering test questions, and develop critical thinking skills. Corequisite(s): IEL 90 , IEL 91 , IEL 92 .
  
  • IEL 94 - Structure & Composition II (0)

    Continue to build and apply knowledge of different types of academic writing and its grammar. Complete a variety of academic writing activities in which the conventions of researching, drafting, citing, revising, and editing are practiced. Prerequisite(s); if any: IEL 90  or placement test. Corequisite(s): IEL 95 , IEL 96 , IEL 97 .
  
  • IEL 95 - Reading & Vocabulary II (0)

    Continue developing reading skills to be successful in academic courses by building academic vocabulary, practicing note-taking of academic readings, understanding and answering test questions, and develop critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s); if any: IEL 91  or placement test. Corequisite(s): IEL 94 , IEL 96 , IEL 97 .
  
  • IEL 96 - Oral Communication II (0)

    Continue to learn and practice academic oral communication skills related to speaking and pronunciation. Continue to practice the conventions of communicating in the American university classroom, complete academic speaking tasks and improve pronunciation. Prerequisite(s); if any: IEL 92  or placement test. Corequisite(s): IEL 94 , IEL 95 , IEL 97 .
  
  • IEL 97 - Listening & Note-Taking II (0)

    Continue developing listening skills to be successful in academic courses by building academic vocabulary, practicing note-taking of academic lectures, understanding and answering test questions, and develop critical thinking skills. Prerequisite(s); if any: IEL 93  or placement test. Corequisite(s): IEL 94 , IEL 95 , IEL 96 .

Italian

  
  • ITA 101 - Beginning Italian I (3)

    Pronunciation and aural comprehension; elementary grammar; oral and written practice; reading of simple prose
  
  • ITA 102 - Beginning Italian II (3)

    Continuation of ITA 101 . Prerequisite(s); if any: ITA 101  or equivalent.
  
  • ITA 200 - Select Topics: Italian (3)

    Topics of various aspects of Italian. May vary from year to year.
  
  • ITA 201 - Intermediate Italian I (3)

    Reading; grammar review; oral work; translation; simple composition. Prerequisite(s); if any: ITA 102 .
  
  • ITA 202 - Intermediate Italian II (3)

    Continuation of ITA 201 . Prerequisite(s); if any: ITA 201 .
  
  • ITA 300 - Advanced Italian II (3)


Japanese

  
  • JPN 101 - Beginning Japanese I (3)

  
  • JPN 102 - Beginning Japanese II (3)


Journalism Studies

  
  • CMM 181 - Intro to Mass Communication (3)

    The mass media play a significant role in your life. Books, newspapers, magazines, movies, music, radio, television, and the Internet are sources of information and entertainment that provide a shared cultural experience. The mass media have also historically shaped our economy and continue to be powerful channels for commerce. Introduction to Mass Communication inspires you to look at the mass media from a historical and critical perspective, and encourages you to become an informed consumer of media.
  
  • CMM 188 - Digital Toolkit (3)

    This course is the starting point for creating multimedia content. Students will get a hands-on introduction to the tools and techniques of multimedia production including video, audio, photography and non-linear editing. They’ll develop their skills through class assignments and online content management, and they’ll use them to create stories. The course involves extensive use of cameras, microphones and editing software.
  
  • CMM 261 - Media Writing (3)

    While each of us may enjoy speaking or typing our words, in media, the person receiving your words is thinking one thing: What are you trying to tell me? Media Writing helps you think critically about your writing as it relates to different platforms and audiences. You will consider both the content and structure of each composition- from a 140-character Tweet to a 500-word story. More importantly, Media Writing prepares you for the professional world with a focus on judgement, accuracy and fairness.
  
  • CMM 261L - Media Writing Lab (1)

    The written word serves as the foundation for all mass media production. While CMM 261 examines story structure and the importance for different media platforms, the co-requisite Media Writing Lab underscores the importance of word choice, sentence construction and meaning.
  
  • CMM 450 - Fieldwork in Communication and Media (3)

    Students will complete an on-site work experience relevant to the Communication and Media major. A minimum of 120-hours must be spent on-site during the semester. Students will also attend weekly one-hour class meetings that focus on career related issues such as resumes, cover letters, portfolios, job searching techniques, networking, interviewing, and negotiation. Instructor permission required.
  
  • CMM 467 - Communication Law (3)

    The First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides individuals and society with cherished rights and protections, including freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press. The history, development, interpretation and application of the First Amendment is explored, as are areas for potential conflicts such as governmental restraint of speech, the right to access places and information, maintaining confidentiality of sources, obscenity, commercial speech, and the rights of a free press versus the right to a fair trial. Communication and media related issues such as libel, privacy, intellectual property and government regulation are also addressed.
  
  • JLM 130 - Tangerine Practicum (1)

    Participation on the staff of the campus newspaper, the Tangerine. Weekly class meeting required. Open to all majors. May be taken four times for credit.
  
  • JLM 133 - UC TV Practicum (1)

    Participation in the staff of UC TV. Weekly class meeting required. Open to all majors. May be taken four times for credit.
  
  • JLM 135 - Video Editing Practicum (1)

    This class is designed to teach the techniques of non-linear video editing, including motion and effects. The class will focus on technical skills and aesthetic choices. Class meets one day a week and is open to all majors.
  
  • JLM 241 - Television Sportscast (3)

    Instruction and experience producing and delivering broadcast sports reports on television newscasts. Emphasis on sports writing for broadcast and studio work.
  
  • JLM 259 - Broadcast News Writing (3)

    Introductory instruction and experience writing news stories for radio and TV. Emphasis on writing anchor copy and field packages including soundbites.
  
  • JLM 262 - Information Gathering & Storytelling (3)

    Instruction and experience in gathering and reporting news. Emphasis on developing stories in depth, interviewing skills, following a beat. Writing for campus newspaper required. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 261  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • JLM 276 - Television Story Production (3)

    Techniques and skills needed to produce news, public service announcements, and other programming styles. Emphasis on camera work, field audio recording, and video editing.
  
  • JLM 285 - Sports and the Media (3)

    Sports have a significant presence in multiple media formats, such as online, television, radio and print, Yet, the various relationships between sport and the media are complex, and often filled with conflicts. These relationships are views from historical, cultural, and business perspectives, as are issues involving the portrayal of race, gender, violence and aggression, business, and free agency in mediated sport. Same as PRL 285 .
  
  • JLM 290 - Independent Study (3)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and his or her instructor, subject to approval of division dean. May be repeated once for credit, though with a different topic.
  
  • JLM 300 - Select Topics: Journalism (1 to 3)

    Topics in various aspects of journalism. May vary from year to year. Prerequisite(s); if any: Permission of the Instructor.
  
  • JLM 325 - Making Public History (3)

    Students will combine research on local topics with hands-on-experience to create professional quality radio, television, and/or online productions, and/or traditional museum exhibits. Projects vary by semester. Same as HIS 325 .
  
  • JLM 336 - Media Programming Strategies (3)

    Theory and practice of broadcast, cable, and Internet program evaluation, selection, and scheduling. Includes decision-making strategies of commercial television, radio, and cable systems, at the network, corporate, and local levels, and non-commercial media. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 181  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • JLM 345 - Broadcast Announcing and Presentation (3)

    Introduction to various aspects of broadcast presentation including announcing for radio and television, studio interviewing, and on-camera presentation in the field and studio. Emphasis on developing presentation skills for news, public service announcements and commercials. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 103 .
  
  • JLM 362 - Watchdog Reporting (3)

    Instruction and experience in reporting politics, police, courts, government, education, environment, and other special topics related to communities. Prerequisite(s); if any: JLM 262 .
  
  • JLM 363 - Magazine Article Writing (3)

    Non-fiction magazine articles and the marketplace today, article ideas and types, query letter writing, networking, copyright, interviewing, search for illustrations, writing styles, and research techniques. Prerequisite(s); if any: ENG 102  or CMM 261  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • JLM 364 - Editing (3)

    Skills and techniques required in editorial positions. Copy editing, headline writing, photo selection and editing. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 261 .
  
  • JLM 365 - Information Design (3)

    Principles and techniques of design with hands-on experience producing feature newspaper pages, computer-designed newsletters, and web pages. Integrating text photos, art-work and other graphic elements.
  
  • JLM 371 - Advanced Reporting Techniques (3)

    Instruction and practice in advanced reporting techniques. Each course offering will have a single focus, rotating among investigative reporting, database reporting or feature writing. Prerequisite(s); if any: JLM 262 .
  
  • JLM 372 - Essentials of News Photography (3)

    Use of still cameras to record news events and create feature photos for print media. Discussion of modern photographic methods. Techniques of photojournalism. Students are responsible for regular access to a 35mm film camera.
  
  • JLM 373 - Digital Photography & Photoshop Techniques (3)

    Use of still cameras, scanners and large manipulation software to produce photographs for print and digital media. Discussion of current photojournalistic practice and techniques.
  
  • JLM 374 - Sportswriting (3)

    Examines changes in nation’s sports pages, methods used to cover community, college, amateur and professional athletics. Students work for area media. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 261 .
  
  • JLM 378 - Television News Field Reporting and Production (3)

    Producing news stories for broadcast. Emphasis generating stories, reporting, spot news, interviewing writing to video, production and port-production. Prerequisite(s); if any: JLM 276 , or COM 276, or JLM 376 or COM 376.
  
  • JLM 381 - Censorship (3)

    History and analysis of censorship in the United States. Impact on the press, broadcasting, literature, film, and the fine arts.
  
  • JLM 390 - Independent Study (3)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and his or her instructor, subject to approval of division dean. May be repeated once for credit, though with a different topic.
  
  • JLM 400 - Topics in Journalism Studies (1 to 6)

    Advanced consideration of selected topics in journalism. May be repeated up to six credit hours provided topics are not the same. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 261  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • JLM 401 - Media Ethics in Contemporary Society (3)

    Ethical and moral considerations as they apply to media and journalists; acceptable and unacceptable practices of contemporary media. Discussion of various media codes of ethics and their applications. Prerequisite(s); if any: JLM 262 .
  
  • JLM 433 - The Olympics (3)

    Historical and contemporary view of the Olympics as a sociological, marketing, and business phenomenon. Emphasis on marketing communication and public relations strategies used to promote the Olympics and athletes. Same as PRL 433 .
  
  • JLM 435 - Sports and Television (3)

    The Super Bowl is the highest rated television program event every year and Super Bowl Sunday has become a de facto holiday. ESPN is one of the most profitable networks in the history of the television. Five of the top ten highest rated television programs of all time are sporting events. The complex symbiotic relationship between sports and television involves a number of players, including producers and programmers; broadcast networks; national and regional sports networks; local television stations; pay-per-view suppliers; and sports organizations. The relationship people have with televised sport and the way televised sport can impact society is also presented.
  
  • JLM 461 - Multimedia Web Design (3)

    Writing and editing stories for online presentation as well as examination of the theoretical, ethical and legal issues involved in working on the Web. Topics include online story structure, linking strategies, and Web usability and design. Prerequisite(s); if any: JLM 261  
  
  • JLM 470 - Journalism Studies - Internship (1 to 12)

    On-site experience with media. On-site hours determined by credits. Weekly journals and paper required. Course may be repeated up to a total of 12 credits. Prerequisite(s); if any: CMM 261  and JLM 262 . Minimum grade of ‘C’ in each. Permission of Instructor required.
  
  • JLM 476 - Producing and Anchoring the News (3)

    Plan and execute all facets of producing weekly newscast, including selecting, writing, editing and prioritizing stories. Rotate through roles (anchor, producer, writer, reporter, editor, camera). Programs recorded in Simon studio. Course may be taken twice. Prerequisite(s); if any: JLM 259  and JLM 276  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • JLM 490 - Independent Study (1 to 3)

    Individually supervised research and study. Provides opportunity for students to engage in original research or to pursue scholarly investigations beyond the boundaries of established courses. Arranged by agreement between the student and his or her instructor, subject to approval of division dean. May be repeated once for credit, though with a different topic.

Latin

  
  • LAT 101 - Beginning Latin I (3)

    Introduction to Latin grammar and syntax with an emphasis on vocabulary building and English derivatives. Reading of simple prose and study of aspects of Roman culture.
  
  • LAT 102 - Beginning Latin II (3)

    Continuation of LAT 101 . Prerequisite(s); if any: LAT 101 .

Liberal Studies

  
  • LST 500 - Select Topics: Liberal Studies (0 to 3)

    Topics in various aspects of Liberal Studies. May vary from year to year.
  
  • LST 503 - Graduate Liberal Studies Seminar (1)

    Explores the significance of interdisciplinary approaches to Liberal Education, emphasizes critical thinking and connections across subject areas, and gives students insight into how interdisciplinary studies are designed, executed, and presented.
  
  • SCI 540 - Contemporary Topics in Science (3)

    Critical analysis of topics drawn from the popular media (television, newspaper, radio, Internet) using primary scientific literature. Topics chosen will reflect scholarly interests of specific faculty.

Management

  
  • BUL 301 - The Legal Environment of Business (3)

    Introduction to the legal system, sources of law, dispute resolution, government regulation of business, law related to employment, the environment, product liability, securities and antitrust.
  
  • BUL 302 - Law of Business Organizations (3)

    Law of business transactions: contracts, agency, negotiable instruments, insurance, property, and professional liability.
  
  • MGT 101 - Introduction to Contemporary Business (3)

    Integrative nature of business; dynamic business environment, global markets, ethical behavior, social responsibility, forms of business ownership, and entrepreneurship; includes team training, oral and written business communications, and methods of researching business information.
  
  • MGT 103 - Introduction to the Business of Health Care (3)

    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the health care industry, an awareness of the many career opportunities available in the field of health care management, and a working knowledge of basic managerial skills as applied in health care settings. Students will interact with current managers employed in both direct and indirect healthcare settings. They also will learn to apply fundamental accounting, marketing, human resource, finance and leadership skills to address a variety of managerial problems.
  
  • MGT 201 - Principles of Organization and Management (3)

    Principles of management and organizational theory. Addresses all functional areas of management, emphasizing key management responsibilities of planning, organizing, controlling, leading, and staffing. Also addresses ethical and social responsibilities, change, and global challenges.  Prerequisite(s); if any: MGT 101  or CMG 103 .
  
  • MGT 202 - Applied Integrated Management (3)

    Integration of teamwork, leadership, business strategy, marketing and sales strategy, customer value, financial reporting, profit management, quality improvement, supply chain management in a global environment through a marketplace computer simulation exercise.  Prerequisite(s); if any: MGT 201  
  
  • MGT 300 - Select Topics: Management (1 to 3)

    Topics in various aspects of Management. May vary from year to year.
  
  • MGT 301 - Strategic Management (3)

    A case study course integrating business strategy at the strategic management level; includes: crafting and executing a world-class strategy, analysis of internal and external environments; competitive, offensive, defensive, merger and acquisition and global strategies.  Prerequisite(s); if any: ECN 241 , FIN 333 , MAT 144  and MGT 202  
  
  • MGT 322 - Managing Information Systems (3)

    Principles of databases and information systems from the following perspectives; accounting, executive, marketing, manufacturing, financial, and human resources. Includes decision support and knowledge-based systems.  Prerequisite(s); if any: CSC 117  or exemption, MGT 201  or Permission of Instructor.
  
  • MGT 325 - Management of Technology (3)

    Emphasizes competitive advantages of managing information technology, including electronic commerce, data warehousing, data mining, supply chain management, enterprise resource planning, wireless and pervasive computing, cloud computing, and social networking. Prerequisite(s); if any: CSC 117  and MGT 201  
 

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